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Updated: 2 years 48 weeks ago

Amateur Radio Newsline is Back! Report #1967 is online!

Sat, 07/11/2015 - 01:11
Amateur Radio Newsline is Back! Report #1967 is online!

I am happy to announce that Amateur Radio Newsline is back and it feels good!!

We're hoping to come in around 18 minutes each week in 2 segments instead of nearly 30 minutes in 3 segments. We're a little shorter than that this week at around12 minutes, Bill, Skeeter and Don talked about making ARNewsline a bit shorter and more modern sounding in a conversation before Bill passed, Bill was in agreement.

The entire newsline team would like to remind you that there are many ways to listen and/or read the weekly news reports, you can go straight to the ducks mouth and visit www.arnewsline.org where you can get the Text, RSS, iTunes and the MP3 version of the weekly newscasts.

Another way is to become a member of the Facebook Group at www.facebook.com/groups/ARNewsline/
Not only do you get the weekly newscasts but you get up to date, current, breaking news along with many other amateur radio news bulletins that may be time sensitive. The ARNewsline Facebook page is "all the news all the time". Member posts are moderated for a specific criteria.

Yet another great way is to subscribe to the weekly ARNewsline Yahoo Groups E-Mail list at arnewsline-subscribe@yahoogroups.com
The weekly ARNewsline reports will be sent to your email or you can read it on the Yahoo Groups page.
The email group posting is closed for members, the email list is for "the reports, only the reports and nothing but the reports".

Don't forget the "Old Skool Way"!!
Do a search within your area to listen to the ARNewsline reports on your local repeater.
There are many, many repeaters out there that play the weekly ARNewsline audio reports, ask around and/or tune around!

From all of the ARNewsline team, thank you all for your patients thru these difficult times, the ARNewsline reports are back and that was a "BIG" wish from Bill before we lost him...

Spread the word, share this post/email and help keep Bills vision, dreams and memory alive.

{ WA6ITF/sk de KB7TBT, it is only a flesh wound, 73 .. }

73
James
KB7TBT

Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) Report 1967 July 10 2015

Sat, 07/11/2015 - 00:47
Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) Report 1967 July 10 2015

Amateur Radio Newsline report number 1967 with a release date of Friday, July 10, 2015 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

The following is a QST. Heightened recognition comes for radio amateurs in the days before Field Day. Some new QSOs make their mark aboard the International Space Station. Changes are coming on 160 meters. In Europe, young hams are packing for a one-week radio camp in Italy for amateurs. And the FCC seeks additional comments for new usage on lower and medium frequency bands. All this and an update on our Young Ham of the Year Award in the Amateur Radio Newsline report number 1967 coming your way right now.

(Billboard Cart Here)

[INTRO TO CHANGES IN ARNEWSLINE FORMAT, REMARKS ABOUT BILL PASTERNAK, SHORT INSERT INTRODUCING NEW STAFFER]

BILL PASTERNAK WA6ITF (SK)/NEWSLINE 2.0
Many of you listening are by now aware that Amateur Radio Newsline lost our Co-founder, Executive Producer, Lead News Writer and friend, Bill Pasternak WA6ITF. Bill became a Silent Key on June 11th, after a series of health setbacks over the previous six months. For more than thirty-seven years, Bill was at the helm of these news bulletins, and led an all-volunteer team of amateur radio enthusiasts—many with a background in broadcasting—who were dedicated to distributing the latest news about the hobby and service of ham radio. Just days before his passing, Don Wilbanks AE5DW and I shared a conference call with Bill to discuss the future of Newsline. I told Bill about an email I received from a ham who was very interested in volunteering to take on the task of writing each week’s newscast script; something Bill had done almost exclusively since its inception as Westlink Amateur Radio News in September of 1977. After hearing her qualifications and background, Bill’s words were—and I quote—“Hire her!”
So now, please join the entire Newsline staff in welcoming aboard Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT as our new Lead News Writer. Caryn lives on Long Island, New York, and holds a General Class ham license. As her QRZ.com profile says, she is a writer, editor, and an equestrian and wildlife rescuer. Now, we'll let Caryn tell you more about herself...


[Caryn's audio]


Thanks, Caryn! And welcome to the Amateur Radio Newline family! Now, with more of this week's news, here is Don Wilbanks AE5DW. Don...?


REGULATIONS AND PROCLAMATIONS

Amateur radio has just come off of a very productive couple of weeks, culminating in Field Day, with recognition by local and national government. Governors in Alabama, Connecticut, Florida, Indiana, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Wisconsin and Washington State were joined by officials in various counties and cities around the nation honoring the hobby with proclamations recognizing hams' public service and emergency response roles. At the same time, lawmakers on Capitol Hill were also turning a sharper focus on hams' service in natural disasters, as Senator Roger Wicker, a Mississippi Republican, presented that chamber's equivalent of the Amateur Radio Parity Act already under consideration in the House of Representatives. The bipartisan bill, cosponsored by Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut, addresses the land-use restrictions that often prohibit amateur radio antennas from being installed, especially in areas where homeowners associations exist and set standards for neighborhood aesthetics. In sponsoring the bill, Wicker noted the role hams had played during Hurricane Katrina, which had left more conventional forms of communication disabled. The bill, which is now on the floor of the Senate, seeks to protect the rights of radio amateurs to install antennas and towers for communication. (ARRL, eham.net)


QSO WITH THE COSMONAUTS

In little more than a month, elementary school students in Bunker Hill, Indiana will be experiencing the ultimate QSO: Sometime in August, they get to work the International Space Station. The students were chosen earlier this year for the program, which is known as Amateur Radio on the International Space Station. Maconaquah Elementary School was among those approved for the coveted DX, which will take shape as a 10-minute QSO on FM. The school district plans to provide a live feed to each of the school district's buildings as well as make the contact available for listeners to hear online. As in years past, hams aboard the space station have been busy connecting with students this year, and recently completed a scheduled radio contact with Tulsa Community College in Oklahoma. On July 1, students there connected with one of the Russian cosmonauts on board. (www.ariss.org, KSL-TV, Tulsa World, Kokomo Tribune)




REGULATION: UPGRADE ON 160 METERS

Amateur Radio will gain primary status in part of the 160 meter band, starting Aug. 5, following an action by the FCC that the agency said reflects an uptick in usage on the band. The FCC decision affects amateur use on the band’s range between 1900 khz and 2000 khz. David Sumner, CEO of the ARRL, said he expected hams would likely have to contend with radio buoys operated on 160 meters out of fishing vessels. But according to the FCC, the buoys are mostly low power and occupy a narrow portion of the band and they are expected to have negligible effect on hams using those frequencies. (ARRL, QRZ.NOW)


AMATEUR RADIO GOES TO CAMP

In Europe, 76 amateur radio operators from more than 22 nations in the International Amateur Radio Union are getting ready to share their youthful enthusiasm for the hobby with one another at the fifth session of YOTA, Youngsters On The Air. The amateur radio summer camp, which attracts hams under the age of 25 in Region 1 of the radio union, is taking place this year in Tuscany, from July 18 through July 25. Its host is Italy's official organization of radio amateurs, the ARI. The annual, week-long event has been held, in previous years, in Finland, Estonia and in Belgium in 2012, the year it made its debut. The program, which is a mix of educational and intercultural events, is expected to feature a presentation on PSK, a workshop on soldering cable connectors and a session on how to build HF wire antennas. There will also be foxhunting and a contest with 70cm handhelds. (Ham.yota.com, Southgate Amateur Radio News)

BREAK 1

Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the N9MCS Repeater Group serving Rockford Illinois.

(5 second pause)









NEW BANDS FOR HAMS

The FCC will continue to receive comments until Aug. 31 on its proposal to establish amateur radio on Low Frequency and Medium Frequency bands. Although amateur radio would have secondary status on the new bands, it would mark the first time hams were permitted on these frequencies, which are identified as 2200 meters on LF and 630 meters on MF. The LF band was previously allocated by the FCC but the MF allocation is still in proposal status.
For amateur radio to operate on either band, operational and technical rules must be added to Part 97. The frequencies are presently in use by utilities using power line carrier systems to control the power grid. The FCC contends that, based on experimental radio operations on these frequencies, particularly on the MF band, the two uses can coexist without interfering with one another. The FCC is seeking input on power limits, antenna height and other relevant limitations that would apply to amateur radio users. The ARRL expects to file comments with the FCC. Others are asked to use the FCC Electronic Comment Filing System and refer to ET Docket No 15-99. (ARRL, FCC)

THE WORLD OF DX

Friday, July 10, is the last opportunity to work Zorro, JH1AJT, who has been QRV as KH0/KH8Z since Monday, July 6 from Saipan, where the noted DXpeditioner has traveled on business. As such, Zorro has been working holiday style on 10, 15 and 20 meters, single sideband. QSL via JH1AJT. (dxworld.net, QRZNOW)

IARU World Championship

The International Amateur Radio Union’s HF World Championship gets under way on Saturday, July 11 at 1200 UTC and challenges operators to contact as many amateurs as they can worldwide in as many ITU zones as possible, with a special emphasis on IARU member society HQ stations. The event concludes on Sunday, July 12 at 1200 UTC. Most activity will be on 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, and 10 meters using CW and SSB. Find detailed information at http://www.arrl.org/iaru-hf-championship and http://www.iaru.org/contests.html

3B8, MAURITIUS
Jean-Paul, HB9ARY, is working Mauritius (AF-049) as 3B8HC until July 25. Activity will include some slow CW but mainly SSB on all HF bands, from 80 to 6 meters. QSL via NI5DX direct.

5B, CYPRUS
You have until July 15 to work Tony, RT9T, who is active in Cyprus as 5B4ALB. QSL 5B4ALB only direct via RT9T.

5Z4, KENYA
Until July 20, Giuseppe, IK2YDJ, will be active from Rongo, Kenya as 5Z4/IK2YDJ, working frequencies between 40 and 6 meters. QSL via his home callsign.

SPECIAL EVENT STATION PV70, BRAZIL
A World War II special event commemorative station has been set up in Brazil by Ronaldo, PS7AB, and will continue through July 30. Station PV70FEB celebrates the 70th anniversary of World War II and honors the importance of peace. The special callsign also honors the Brazilian Expeditionary Force on Italy’s battlefields, and pays tribute to all others who participated in the war. Certificates will be sent in 2016 via email to all stations who complete contacts with at least 10 special event stations on SSB, digital or CW. QSL via PS7AB, direct (2 USDs), by the Bureau, eQSL or LoTW.

This week’s DX news courtesy of Ohio-Penn DX newsletter .

NEWSCAST CLOSE

With thanks to Alan Labs, AMSAT, the ARRL, CQ Magazine, The FCC, Southgate News, Youngsters on the Air, KSL-TV, the Tulsa World, eham.net, the Ohio-Penn DX newsletter, TWiT TV, the Kokomo Tribune and you our listeners. Our email address for news tips and comments is arnewslinetips@gmail.com. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website located at www.arnewsline.org. You can also write to us or support us at Amateur Radio Newsline, 28197 Robin Avenue, Santa Clarita, CA 91350.

For now, with our news team worldwide, I’m Skeeter Nash, N5ASH, in Topeka, Kansas and from New Orleans, Don Wilbanks AE5DW.saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2015. All rights reserved.

Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) Report 1967 July 10 2015

Sat, 07/11/2015 - 00:47
Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) Report 1967 July 10 2015

Amateur Radio Newsline report number 1967 with a release date of Friday, July 10, 2015 to follow in 5-4-3-2-1.

The following is a QST. Heightened recognition comes for radio amateurs in the days before Field Day. Some new QSOs make their mark aboard the International Space Station. Changes are coming on 160 meters. In Europe, young hams are packing for a one-week radio camp in Italy for amateurs. And the FCC seeks additional comments for new usage on lower and medium frequency bands. All this and an update on our Young Ham of the Year Award in the Amateur Radio Newsline report number 1967 coming your way right now.

(Billboard Cart Here)

[INTRO TO CHANGES IN ARNEWSLINE FORMAT, REMARKS ABOUT BILL PASTERNAK, SHORT INSERT INTRODUCING NEW STAFFER]

BILL PASTERNAK WA6ITF (SK)/NEWSLINE 2.0
Many of you listening are by now aware that Amateur Radio Newsline lost our Co-founder, Executive Producer, Lead News Writer and friend, Bill Pasternak WA6ITF. Bill became a Silent Key on June 11th, after a series of health setbacks over the previous six months. For more than thirty-seven years, Bill was at the helm of these news bulletins, and led an all-volunteer team of amateur radio enthusiasts—many with a background in broadcasting—who were dedicated to distributing the latest news about the hobby and service of ham radio. Just days before his passing, Don Wilbanks AE5DW and I shared a conference call with Bill to discuss the future of Newsline. I told Bill about an email I received from a ham who was very interested in volunteering to take on the task of writing each week’s newscast script; something Bill had done almost exclusively since its inception as Westlink Amateur Radio News in September of 1977. After hearing her qualifications and background, Bill’s words were—and I quote—“Hire her!”
So now, please join the entire Newsline staff in welcoming aboard Caryn Eve Murray KD2GUT as our new Lead News Writer. Caryn lives on Long Island, New York, and holds a General Class ham license. As her QRZ.com profile says, she is a writer, editor, and an equestrian and wildlife rescuer. Now, we'll let Caryn tell you more about herself...


[Caryn's audio]


Thanks, Caryn! And welcome to the Amateur Radio Newline family! Now, with more of this week's news, here is Don Wilbanks AE5DW. Don...?


REGULATIONS AND PROCLAMATIONS

Amateur radio has just come off of a very productive couple of weeks, culminating in Field Day, with recognition by local and national government. Governors in Alabama, Connecticut, Florida, Indiana, New Hampshire, Oklahoma, Wisconsin and Washington State were joined by officials in various counties and cities around the nation honoring the hobby with proclamations recognizing hams' public service and emergency response roles. At the same time, lawmakers on Capitol Hill were also turning a sharper focus on hams' service in natural disasters, as Senator Roger Wicker, a Mississippi Republican, presented that chamber's equivalent of the Amateur Radio Parity Act already under consideration in the House of Representatives. The bipartisan bill, cosponsored by Democratic Senator Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut, addresses the land-use restrictions that often prohibit amateur radio antennas from being installed, especially in areas where homeowners associations exist and set standards for neighborhood aesthetics. In sponsoring the bill, Wicker noted the role hams had played during Hurricane Katrina, which had left more conventional forms of communication disabled. The bill, which is now on the floor of the Senate, seeks to protect the rights of radio amateurs to install antennas and towers for communication. (ARRL, eham.net)


QSO WITH THE COSMONAUTS

In little more than a month, elementary school students in Bunker Hill, Indiana will be experiencing the ultimate QSO: Sometime in August, they get to work the International Space Station. The students were chosen earlier this year for the program, which is known as Amateur Radio on the International Space Station. Maconaquah Elementary School was among those approved for the coveted DX, which will take shape as a 10-minute QSO on FM. The school district plans to provide a live feed to each of the school district's buildings as well as make the contact available for listeners to hear online. As in years past, hams aboard the space station have been busy connecting with students this year, and recently completed a scheduled radio contact with Tulsa Community College in Oklahoma. On July 1, students there connected with one of the Russian cosmonauts on board. (www.ariss.org, KSL-TV, Tulsa World, Kokomo Tribune)




REGULATION: UPGRADE ON 160 METERS

Amateur Radio will gain primary status in part of the 160 meter band, starting Aug. 5, following an action by the FCC that the agency said reflects an uptick in usage on the band. The FCC decision affects amateur use on the band’s range between 1900 khz and 2000 khz. David Sumner, CEO of the ARRL, said he expected hams would likely have to contend with radio buoys operated on 160 meters out of fishing vessels. But according to the FCC, the buoys are mostly low power and occupy a narrow portion of the band and they are expected to have negligible effect on hams using those frequencies. (ARRL, QRZ.NOW)


AMATEUR RADIO GOES TO CAMP

In Europe, 76 amateur radio operators from more than 22 nations in the International Amateur Radio Union are getting ready to share their youthful enthusiasm for the hobby with one another at the fifth session of YOTA, Youngsters On The Air. The amateur radio summer camp, which attracts hams under the age of 25 in Region 1 of the radio union, is taking place this year in Tuscany, from July 18 through July 25. Its host is Italy's official organization of radio amateurs, the ARI. The annual, week-long event has been held, in previous years, in Finland, Estonia and in Belgium in 2012, the year it made its debut. The program, which is a mix of educational and intercultural events, is expected to feature a presentation on PSK, a workshop on soldering cable connectors and a session on how to build HF wire antennas. There will also be foxhunting and a contest with 70cm handhelds. (Ham.yota.com, Southgate Amateur Radio News)

BREAK 1

Time for you to identify your station. We are the Amateur Radio Newsline, heard on bulletin stations around the world including the N9MCS Repeater Group serving Rockford Illinois.

(5 second pause)









NEW BANDS FOR HAMS

The FCC will continue to receive comments until Aug. 31 on its proposal to establish amateur radio on Low Frequency and Medium Frequency bands. Although amateur radio would have secondary status on the new bands, it would mark the first time hams were permitted on these frequencies, which are identified as 2200 meters on LF and 630 meters on MF. The LF band was previously allocated by the FCC but the MF allocation is still in proposal status.
For amateur radio to operate on either band, operational and technical rules must be added to Part 97. The frequencies are presently in use by utilities using power line carrier systems to control the power grid. The FCC contends that, based on experimental radio operations on these frequencies, particularly on the MF band, the two uses can coexist without interfering with one another. The FCC is seeking input on power limits, antenna height and other relevant limitations that would apply to amateur radio users. The ARRL expects to file comments with the FCC. Others are asked to use the FCC Electronic Comment Filing System and refer to ET Docket No 15-99. (ARRL, FCC)

THE WORLD OF DX

Friday, July 10, is the last opportunity to work Zorro, JH1AJT, who has been QRV as KH0/KH8Z since Monday, July 6 from Saipan, where the noted DXpeditioner has traveled on business. As such, Zorro has been working holiday style on 10, 15 and 20 meters, single sideband. QSL via JH1AJT. (dxworld.net, QRZNOW)

IARU World Championship

The International Amateur Radio Union’s HF World Championship gets under way on Saturday, July 11 at 1200 UTC and challenges operators to contact as many amateurs as they can worldwide in as many ITU zones as possible, with a special emphasis on IARU member society HQ stations. The event concludes on Sunday, July 12 at 1200 UTC. Most activity will be on 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, and 10 meters using CW and SSB. Find detailed information at http://www.arrl.org/iaru-hf-championship and http://www.iaru.org/contests.html

3B8, MAURITIUS
Jean-Paul, HB9ARY, is working Mauritius (AF-049) as 3B8HC until July 25. Activity will include some slow CW but mainly SSB on all HF bands, from 80 to 6 meters. QSL via NI5DX direct.

5B, CYPRUS
You have until July 15 to work Tony, RT9T, who is active in Cyprus as 5B4ALB. QSL 5B4ALB only direct via RT9T.

5Z4, KENYA
Until July 20, Giuseppe, IK2YDJ, will be active from Rongo, Kenya as 5Z4/IK2YDJ, working frequencies between 40 and 6 meters. QSL via his home callsign.

SPECIAL EVENT STATION PV70, BRAZIL
A World War II special event commemorative station has been set up in Brazil by Ronaldo, PS7AB, and will continue through July 30. Station PV70FEB celebrates the 70th anniversary of World War II and honors the importance of peace. The special callsign also honors the Brazilian Expeditionary Force on Italy’s battlefields, and pays tribute to all others who participated in the war. Certificates will be sent in 2016 via email to all stations who complete contacts with at least 10 special event stations on SSB, digital or CW. QSL via PS7AB, direct (2 USDs), by the Bureau, eQSL or LoTW.

This week’s DX news courtesy of Ohio-Penn DX newsletter .

NEWSCAST CLOSE

With thanks to Alan Labs, AMSAT, the ARRL, CQ Magazine, The FCC, Southgate News, Youngsters on the Air, KSL-TV, the Tulsa World, eham.net, the Ohio-Penn DX newsletter, TWiT TV, the Kokomo Tribune and you our listeners. Our email address for news tips and comments is arnewslinetips@gmail.com. More information is available at Amateur Radio Newsline's only official website located at www.arnewsline.org. You can also write to us or support us at Amateur Radio Newsline, 28197 Robin Avenue, Santa Clarita, CA 91350.

For now, with our news team worldwide, I’m Skeeter Nash, N5ASH, in Topeka, Kansas and from New Orleans, Don Wilbanks AE5DW.saying 73 and as always we thank you for listening.

Amateur Radio Newsline(tm) is Copyright 2015. All rights reserved.

ICQPodcast interviews Martin Lynch

Fri, 07/10/2015 - 10:54
Martin Butler (M1MRB / W9ICQ) of the ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast interviews Martin Lynch of Martin Lynch & Sons at the Ham Radio Friedrichshafen Show.




You can download the free ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast Audio Show at http://icqpodcast.com/download-the-show/


Latest Amateur / Ham Radio News - http://icqpodcast.com/news/


ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast - http://www.icqpodcast.com

ICQPodcast interviews Martin Lynch

Fri, 07/10/2015 - 10:54
Martin Butler (M1MRB / W9ICQ) of the ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast interviews Martin Lynch of Martin Lynch & Sons at the Ham Radio Friedrichshafen Show.




You can download the free ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast Audio Show at http://icqpodcast.com/download-the-show/


Latest Amateur / Ham Radio News - http://icqpodcast.com/news/


ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast - http://www.icqpodcast.com

ICQ Podcast Interviews Flex Radio Systems

Fri, 07/10/2015 - 10:51
Martin Butler (M1MRB / W9ICQ) of the ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast interviews Gerald Youngblood (K5SDR) of Flex Radio Systems at the Ham Radio Friedrichshafen Show.



You can download the free ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast Audio Show at http://icqpodcast.com/download-the-show/

Latest Amateur / Ham Radio News - http://icqpodcast.com/news/

ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast - http://www.icqpodcast.com

ICQ Podcast Interviews Flex Radio Systems

Fri, 07/10/2015 - 10:51
Martin Butler (M1MRB / W9ICQ) of the ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast interviews Gerald Youngblood (K5SDR) of Flex Radio Systems at the Ham Radio Friedrichshafen Show.



You can download the free ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast Audio Show at http://icqpodcast.com/download-the-show/

Latest Amateur / Ham Radio News - http://icqpodcast.com/news/

ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast - http://www.icqpodcast.com

HamRadioNow: Adventures of a Hacker turned Ham; Intro to DMR from the Hamvention

Thu, 07/09/2015 - 16:04

HAMRADIONOW.tv

Episodes 210:
Introduction to DMR
Episodes 211: Adventures of a Hacker turned Ham

Episode 210: Introduction to DMR. This is John Burningham W2XAB's forum at the Hamvention. John explains the in's and out's of DMR, Digital Mobile Radio (often referred to as MotoTRBO). DMR is a commercial radio system that's been making serious inroads in VHF/UHF Amateur Radio digital voice. If you're curious about it, this forum will take you to the point where you can get a radio and jump in.

Episode 211: Adventures of a Hacker turned Ham. I'll put this one in the video window below. It's the program from the TAPR/AMSAT Banquet on Friday at the the Hamvention. The Hacker turned Ham is Michael Ossmann AD0NR, inventor of the HackRF SDR board. As he tells his story, he weaves in the question (and answer) where is the next generation of hams coming from? AMSAT President Steve Bible N7HPR introduces Michael, and leads off with an interesting survey of the assembled audience.

Before Michael begins, (and after I make my pitch for participation in the KICKSTARTER to fund making video of the ARRL/TAPR DCC in October), we hear from Thani Ali al-Malki, a guest from the Qatar Satellite Company with the exciting news that their next satellite, Es'HailSAT-2, will carry a ham radio transponder in geosynchronous orbit. It's a project of the Qatar Amater Radio Society and AMSAT DL (Germany). This satellite's footprint will be the Middle-East, Europe, Africa and the western side of Asia, but (alas for us in North America), no coverage in the Western Hemisphere except a bit of far-eastern South America). But AMSAT's foot is in the door of geosynchronous satellites, and the pitch to others to host ham radio will be easier.

Don't have time for the video? Our audio podcast RSS feed is at http://HamRadioNow.tv/hrnrss.xml. You'll need to enter that manually in your podcast app. Then you can subscribe and get podcasts automatically as we produce them, and listen on your next commute to work.



Download the audio, or subscribe to the RSS podcast feed
by manually entering http://hamradionow.tv/hrnrss/xml
in your podcast app

Watch all our programs on our web page:

HAMRADIONOW.tv

HamRadioNow is supported by viewer contributions
If you enjoy the programs, visit www.HamRadioNow.tv and "click the pig"





THANK YOU to all our contributors!

HamRadioNow: Adventures of a Hacker turned Ham; Intro to DMR from the Hamvention

Thu, 07/09/2015 - 16:04

HAMRADIONOW.tv

Episodes 210:
Introduction to DMR
Episodes 211: Adventures of a Hacker turned Ham

Episode 210: Introduction to DMR. This is John Burningham W2XAB's forum at the Hamvention. John explains the in's and out's of DMR, Digital Mobile Radio (often referred to as MotoTRBO). DMR is a commercial radio system that's been making serious inroads in VHF/UHF Amateur Radio digital voice. If you're curious about it, this forum will take you to the point where you can get a radio and jump in.

Episode 211: Adventures of a Hacker turned Ham. I'll put this one in the video window below. It's the program from the TAPR/AMSAT Banquet on Friday at the the Hamvention. The Hacker turned Ham is Michael Ossmann AD0NR, inventor of the HackRF SDR board. As he tells his story, he weaves in the question (and answer) where is the next generation of hams coming from? AMSAT President Steve Bible N7HPR introduces Michael, and leads off with an interesting survey of the assembled audience.

Before Michael begins, (and after I make my pitch for participation in the KICKSTARTER to fund making video of the ARRL/TAPR DCC in October), we hear from Thani Ali al-Malki, a guest from the Qatar Satellite Company with the exciting news that their next satellite, Es'HailSAT-2, will carry a ham radio transponder in geosynchronous orbit. It's a project of the Qatar Amater Radio Society and AMSAT DL (Germany). This satellite's footprint will be the Middle-East, Europe, Africa and the western side of Asia, but (alas for us in North America), no coverage in the Western Hemisphere except a bit of far-eastern South America). But AMSAT's foot is in the door of geosynchronous satellites, and the pitch to others to host ham radio will be easier.

Don't have time for the video? Our audio podcast RSS feed is at http://HamRadioNow.tv/hrnrss.xml. You'll need to enter that manually in your podcast app. Then you can subscribe and get podcasts automatically as we produce them, and listen on your next commute to work.



Download the audio, or subscribe to the RSS podcast feed
by manually entering http://hamradionow.tv/hrnrss/xml
in your podcast app

Watch all our programs on our web page:

HAMRADIONOW.tv

HamRadioNow is supported by viewer contributions
If you enjoy the programs, visit www.HamRadioNow.tv and "click the pig"





THANK YOU to all our contributors!

The ARRL Letter, July 9, 2015

Thu, 07/09/2015 - 14:35
The ARRL Letter
July 9, 2015
Rick Lindquist, WW1ME, Editor

[Note: Clicking on the story links below will take you to the news article as it appears in The ARRL Letter on the ARRL website.]




Amateur Radio Becomes Primary on 1900-2000 kHz on August 6

Amateur Radio will be upgraded from secondary to primary in the 1900-2000 kHz segment of 160 meters in the US on August 6. That's the effective date of the WRC-07 implementation Report and Order and WRC-12 Order portions of a lengthy FCC document released on April 27. Both appeared in the Federal Register on July 7; the Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) of the same proceeding was published in the Federal Register on July 2. The Radiolocation Service (RLS) has been primary in the band segment. The FCC also made a secondary allocation of 135.7-137.8 kHz to the Amateur Service, but this band will not be available until service rules have been adopted.

"The FCC action with respect to 1900-2000 kHz reduces the possibility that we might suffer in the future from new Radiolocation Service deployments," said ARRL CEO David Sumner, K1ZZ. "On the other hand, we will have to put up with radio buoys that have been operating illegally in the band but that now have been 'regularized' by the Commission."

The FCC said that while it had believed there was no non-Federal RLS use of the 1900-2000 kHz band, the record indicated there are maritime users, including the US "high seas" migratory species fishing fleets, making use of radio buoys in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans as well as within 200 nautical miles of the coast. It did not identify these users in the WRC-07 proceeding, however, "because they did not appear in its licensing database," it said.

"Apparently, fishing vessels have operated radio buoys in US waters under the belief that a ship station license issued under Part 80 of the Commission's rules permits operation of the buoys," the FCC Order continued. The FCC said a Part 80 license applies only to stations in the maritime services and does not authorize operation of radio stations requiring a Part 90 license, "such as the radio buoys at issue here."

The FCC said its action regarding 1900-2000 kHz supports increased use of 160 meters as reported by commenters in the proceeding and provides "spectrum support" for Amateur Radio emergency communication. The FCC said its action also offers the Amateur Service "the long-term security that primary status entails."

In removing the primary RLS allocation, the FCC added a new footnote to the US Table of Allocations that provides for radio buoy operations in the 1900-2000 kHz segment on a primary basis in Region 2 (the Americas) and on a secondary basis in Region 3, which limits operations to the open sea.

The FCC also concluded that it is in the public interest to establish a secondary Amateur Radio allocation at 135.7-137.8 kHz -- 2200 meters, although the new band is not yet authorized for amateur use. "In accordance with the WRC-07 Final Acts, the Commission also restricted use of this secondary Amateur Service allocation to amateur stations transmitting a maximum equivalent isotropically radiated power (EIRP) of 1 W." The Commission is inviting comments until August 31 on how it should structure operational rules for that allocation as well as for a proposed 472-479 kHz allocation, 630 meters. Read more.

ARRL Patrons Donate Warhol Print to League; Auction Proceeds Will Create Endowment

ARRL patron and well-known Hollywood producer Dave Bell, W6AQ, and his wife Sam, W6QLT (she's a quilter), have donated a signed Andy Warhol print to the ARRL. The artwork -- "Myths: Superman 1981" -- will be sold at auction and the proceeds used to create "The Dave Bell, W6AQ, Endowment Fund" to benefit the League. The print's value has been estimated to be in the vicinity of $150,000. Bell said he wanted to encourage other radio amateurs who might own valuable artworks to consider donating them to ARRL.

"I suspect that I'm not the only amateur art collector among the ham radio population," Bell told ARRL recently. "I'm not sure that it's ever occurred to any of these hams that one way to make a donation is to give a painting to the League."

Bell, a ham since 1951 and a past chairman of the ARRL Public Relations Committee, acquired the Superman print in the early 1990s, and it hung in his Hollywood office for years. "I was looking around for a Warhol, and a friend of mine was an art dealer, and he came across this 'Superman' print and he gave me a very good price on it, so I bought it," Bell said. He once owned another Warhol, which he gave to Hiram College, his alma mater.

Hollywood movie producer David Wolper sold the print to Bell, who said it had hung in Wolper's screening room for a decade or so. During his own working years, Bell was a television and movie producer. He started TV's "Unsolved Mysteries" and also produced some movies ("Nadia," "The Long Walk Home"). Amateur Radio was the focus of some of his productions, including "The World of Amateur Radio" and

"Amateur Radio Today." In 2003 the League presented Bell with its first Lifetime Achievement Award, for his work on films and videos about Amateur Radio. "I had an entertaining career," he punned. He was also the Dayton Hamvention® Amateur of the Year in 1984. His book World's Best Hobby, available from ARRL and elsewhere, details his professional and Amateur Radio lives.

One reason he purchased the Superman print in particular, he said, was that he could imagine an Amateur Radio handheld in the Man of Steel's outstretched hand. "He should be 'Superham,'" Bell quipped.

ARRL President Kay Craigie, N3KN, announced the donation in May at an ARRL donors' reception in conjunction with Dayton Hamvention®. "Dave and Sam have always supported ARRL most generously, and this latest gift to the Endowment Fund will ensure their support never stops," President Craigie told the gathering. "I would like to say 'thank you' for your thoughtful support. You are truly a 'Superman' to ARRL!" Read more.

Museum Donates Doug DeMaw, W1FB, Homebrew Equipment to ARRL

The Vintage Radio and Communications Museum of Connecticut (VRCMCT) has donated equipment designed by former ARRL staffer Doug Demaw, W1FB (SK), to ARRL Headquarters for exhibit. One of the most widely published technical writers in Amateur Radio, DeMaw -- who earlier held the call signs W1CER and W8HHS -- was on the HQ staff for 18 years, from 1965 to 1983, and he served as Senior Technical Editor and Technical Department Manager from 1970 to 1983. Beginning in 1970, he engineered a shift in emphasis toward solid-state design in QST and in The ARRL Handbook. After retiring in 1983, DeMaw founded Oak Hills Research, but he continued to write construction articles for QST as well as books, including W1FB's QRP Notebook and W1FB's Antenna Notebook.

"The ARRL has a significant collection of Amateur Radio-related historical documents and equipment," said ARRL Senior Test Engineer, Bob Allison, WB1GCM. "Besides the 'Evolution of Amateur Radio Equipment' exhibit at the Lab, we have a 'Made in the Lab' exhibit. Doug DeMaw and his Lab staff built equipment that many radio amateurs duplicated at home. They are an important part of the history of Amateur Radio and ARRL."

It's still unclear just how the museum ended up with its collection of DeMaw project prototypes. With the exception of his famous "Tuna Tin" QRP transmitter, which was detailed in the May 1976 issue of QST and also appeared on its cover, DeMaw retained his projects after the articles about them had been published, in line with the HQ custom of that era. When DeMaw died in 1997, though, the whereabouts of many of his construction projects was unknown. Recently, Allison spotted something that looked familiar in a box of parts at the VRCMCT. Allison, who is a museum board member and ARRL historical collection curator, instantly recognized a receiver that DeMaw had featured in a series of articles.

After some digging, more boxes containing other DeMaw construction projects were discovered. Apparently, an anonymous donor at some point had dropped off the items, some bearing Oak Hills Research stickers, at the museum. During an impromptu meeting conducted by Museum Director John Ellsworth, the museum board -- all ARRL members -- agreed that DeMaw's work belonged at ARRL Headquarters.

"We're in the preservation business too," said Ellsworth. "We're glad to make this donation to ARRL, which will preserve and display DeMaw's work." Read more.

Ham Radio Volunteers Support Oklahoma Freewheel Bicycle Ride

A small group of Amateur Radio operators and volunteers supported the Oklahoma Freewheel -- a cross-state bicycle tour -- June 7-13. Kenneth Baucum, KG5CBM, led the Amateur Radio contingent.

"This year, Freewheel started in Hollis, Oklahoma, and finished in Fort Smith, Arkansas," Baucum said. "Bicyclists completed a tour of about 500 miles in 7 days, completing an average of 65 miles each day." He said some of those in the ham radio contingent are also ARES volunteers.

Baucum said SAG support driver responsibilities included carrying water to replenish rest stops and rider water bottles on the route, as well as having spare tubes and tire pumps on hand to fix flat tires. "Cyclists would request support by flagging down a support vehicle, or calling the support number," he said. Baucum then would relay messages, as appropriate, to the driver nearest the incident.

"Common issues included flat tires, slipped chains, and shifters needing adjustment," Baucum said. "A few calls for medical support were handled by providing first aid, water, and shade or air conditioning for riders in distress."

Oklahoma Freewheel expressed its appreciation to the radio amateurs who volunteered and to for the support of local radio clubs and the use of their repeaters. Read more. -- Thanks to Kenneth Baucum, KG5CBM, and Lloyd Colston, KC5FM

Friedrichshafen HAM RADIO 2015 Hosts International Youth Gathering

The just-ended HAM RADIO 2015 in Friedrichshafen, Germany hosted an international gathering of Amateur Radio youth. HAM RADIO sponsors reported that more than 17,000 visitors attended the combined HAM RADIO and the Maker World 2015 events -- about the same as in 2014. HAM RADIO celebrated its 40th year this year and attracted visitors from around the world to the shores of Lake Constance.

"HAM RADIO 2015 went really well," said Steffen Schöppe, DL7ATE, chairman of the German Amateur Radio Club (DARC), which co-sponsored HAM RADIO and marked its 65th anniversary this year. "It met our expectations in every way. We are very pleased with the supporting program, such as teacher training, the Ham Rally, and the presentations."

On Saturday, June 27, German Youth Coordinator Annette Coenen, DL6SAK, and IARU Region 1 Youth Working Group Chair Lisa Leenders, PA2LS, jointly hosted the International Youth Meeting. IARU Region 1 sponsors a "Youngsters On The Air" (YOTA) program -- a 1-week summer youth exchange program involving 75 youthful radio amateurs and prospective hams from 22 countries -- held this year in Italy. Region 1 also sponsors a YOTA Month program each December.

One main discussion topic concerned the difficulty of obtaining an Amateur Radio license in some countries. Roadblocks cited included fees, minimum age, exam locations and levels, and availability of learning materials.

Presentations included the introduction of the new Youth Contest Program in IARU Region 1, and the youth contesting initiative at 9A1A and 9A1RBZ -- the "Amateur Radio in School" station of the Croatian DX Club. An Amateur Radio course has been integrated into the elective courses at the Technical School Rudera Boskovica in Croatia.

Each year there is a beginner's class, and students who pass can participate in 9A1RBZ activities. Since 2012, some 165 youngsters have completed the class. Aspiring young contesters are paired with experienced contesters at 9A1A. In 2014, nine youngsters joined the world-class 9A1A team for the CQ World Wide RTTY contest. By this year, 39 percent of the Croatian DX Club members were between the ages of 16 and 19.

"Youngsters are not interested only in mobile and Internet communications," the club concluded. "If you approach them in an appropriate way, they are recognizing Amateur Radio as a very interesting hobby." 9A1A will host an international youth contesting team twice a year starting in 2016.

The IARU R1 Youth Contest Program plans to pair teams of about six visiting young operators with about six home country operators at well-known contest stations throughout Europe. It will get under way this fall with a four-contest 2015-2016 schedule.

Several PowerPoint and synchronized-audio keynote lectures from HAM RADIO 2015 are available on the Documentary Archive website.

Pioneering Remote Multi-Multi K4VV Contesting Station Closes, But Project Continues

Due to health issues facing Jack Hammett, K4VV, the Virginia mountaintop station bearing his call sign that pioneered totally remote multioperator, multitransmitter (MM) contesting, has been shut down. The equipment is being dismantled and sold off. The K4VV remote multi-multi contest station project team won't be disbanding, however. Instead, it will transition from "Team K4VV" to "Team W0YR," operating from another Virginia station some 18 miles from the K4VV site, said Mike Lonneke, W0YR.

"This past winter's brutal conditions caused serious damage to antennas on three of the towers at the big K4VV contest station, sitting atop Virginia's Catoctin Ridge," Lonneke told ARRL. He said Hammett, a veteran contester, had built K4VV into a contest superstation, but more recent health problems had prevented him from being actively involved in the station's activities. The 20-member Team K4VV has been operating Hammett's station for the past 5 years at his invitation, and the contest enthusiasts turned K4VV into the first completely remote MM contesting superstation.

With no operators in the K4VV shack, Team K4VV finished 10th in the ARRL International DX SSB this past March, with a claimed score of 5.3 million points. At the end of March, the team managed an 11th place claimed finish in the CQ World Wide WPX SSB, operating as AC3U, racking up 14.3 million points.

"Then, things came apart," Lonneke said. "The drive mechanism on K4VV's Super Bertha failed, boom guys on the top four element 40 meter OWA Yagi worked loose and hung down, endangering other antennas, and several other serious problems came to light." He said Team K4VV members were ready to carry out the repairs, but when Lonneke approached Hammett to have the work done, he learned that, in view of Hammett's worsening health, his family had decided to close the station.

With its new name and renewed spirit, Team W0YR has begun planning to resume its totally remote MM contesting activities in earnest this September. W0YR recently took delivery of a new, additional tower. In June, Lonneke upgraded his station's vital Internet connection to equal the data throughput speeds that had been available at K4VV.

"The team is getting ready to work the IARU HF World Champsionship in order to 'wring out' any faults," Lonneke told ARRL this week. "Even though there is no MM category in the IARU, we will run MM and turn in a checklog." Read more. -- Thanks to Mike Lonneke, W0YR

UK Government Holds Up Export of Early Amateur Radio-Related TV Archive

Most encyclopedias say that the first transatlantic television transmissions took place via the Telstar I satellite in 1962, but TV images actually crossed the Atlantic in the late 1920s via an Amateur Radio transmitter, according to historical accounts. An archive of documents and other material related to that event from television pioneer John Logie Baird and his colleague Benjamin Clapp, [G]2KZ, is at risk of being exported, and the government doesn't want to see it leave Britain. Clapp's 2 kW transmitter was used to send the crude images to a receiving station near New York City, and the archive includes some of his Amateur Radio logbooks as well as a hand telegraph key. UK Culture Minister John Vaizey has declined to issue an export license in an effort to prevent the historic archive from leaving the UK.

According to a UK government statement, Baird -- a Scottish engineer -- and Clapp first transmitted the television images over telephone lines from Baird's laboratory in London to Clapp's house in Surrey. From there, Clapp's transmitter, identified by his Amateur Radio call sign, was used to send the images across the Atlantic, where Clapp was among those on hand in Hartsdale, New York, to receive them.

"Man's vision had spanned the ocean; transatlantic television was a demonstrated reality, and one more great dream of science was on the way to realization," said a February 9, 1928, account in The New York Times that cited an Associated Press reporter who witnessed the accomplishment. The Times article listed the operator of the "vision sound" receiving station as R.M. Hart, 2CVJ. The Times put Baird's feat on a par with Marconi's legendary transatlantic reception of the Morse code letter "s" many years earlier.

The archive, valued at more than $50,000, consists of Clapp's radio logbooks for the US receiving station as well as for his own [G]2KZ amateur station, plus "related paper ephemera," and a so-called "Phonovision" disc that contains an early video recording, made in the fall of 1927, depicting images of Baird's ventriloquist's dummy, "Stookie Bill." The Phonovision disc is believed to be the oldest surviving video recording. Baird had demonstrated his electro-mechanical television system to members of the Royal Institution a year earlier.

Vaizey based his decision to bar the possible export of the items on a recommendation by the Reviewing Committee on the Export of Works of Art and Objects of Cultural Interest (RCEWA), administered by Arts Council England. "The Columbia disc and the notes connected with this world first of a transantlantic video recording represents British ingenuity and invention at the highest level," said RCEWA Member Christopher Rowell. "The notes contain the first ever use of the acronym 'TV' for television. The excitement of the achievement rests in these objects, which we hope will remain in this country as a permanent testament to Logie Baird and his team. Their departure abroad would also be a serious loss to scholarship." Read more.

In Brief...

ARRL/TAPR Digital Communications Conference Seeks Papers: The 34th annual ARRL/TAPR Digital Communications Conference (DCC) invites technical papers for presentation at this year's conference. The 2015 DCC will take place October 9-11 in Chicago. Technical papers are solicited for presentation at DCC and publication in the Conference Proceedings, published by ARRL. Presentation at the conference is not required for publication. Submit papers by August 17 to Maty Weinberg, KB1EIB, at ARRL (or mail to Maty Weinberg, ARRL, 225 Main St, Newington, CT 06111). Papers will be published exactly as submitted, and authors will retain all rights. Early conference registration closes on September 19.

Get Ready for the Golden Packet Event! APRS Developer Bob Bruninga, WB4APR, has invited radio amateurs to take part in the annual Golden Packet Event on Saturday, July 18. Begun in 2009, the event is a demonstration of the ability to relay text messages via the Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS®) along the length of the Appalachian Trail -- all without the use of the Internet. All participants need is an APRS digipeating transceiver and an APRS handheld transceiver for backup messaging.

CAMSAT Renames, Postpones Six-Satellite Launch: CAMSAT has announced new nomenclature for the six satellites that it planned to launch this summer. CAS-3A through F have been re-designated as the XW-2 (Hope-2) amateur satellite system -- XW-2A through F. CAMSAT said this week that all six satellites have completed environmental testing and are currently undergoing burn-in testing. The satellites will be moved to the launch site in mid-August, but the launch has been postponed from mid-July until early September. The six satellites are equipped with substantially identical Amateur Radio payloads -- a U/V mode linear transponder, a CW telemetry beacon and an AX.25 19.2k/9.6k baud GMSK telemetry downlink, a CAMSAT announcement said in May. CAMSAT said that each Amateur Radio complement has the same technical characteristics, but will operate on different 70 centimeter uplink and 2 meter downlink frequencies.

MRHS "Night of Nights 2015" Set for July 12: The Marine Radio Historical Society (MRHS) will hold its annual "Night of Nights" event, in which historic maritime CW stations such as KPH and WLO return to the air for a few hours on July 13 UTC (July 12 in US time zones) along with some US Coast Guard stations. The event commemorates the days when coast station and shipboard radio operators transmitted their message traffic via Morse code. A pair of Amateur Radio stations -- K6KPH and W4WLO -- will be active on CW as well, and QSL cards will be sent to those who copy the text of the maritime stations' CW signals or work the ham stations. The coast stations shut down in the late 1990s, but the MRHS has resurrected KPH and attempts to preserve the history of the era.

AMSAT 2015 Symposium Invites Papers: AMSAT has issued the first call for papers for its Annual Meeting and Space Symposium, set for October 16-18 in Dayton, Ohio. Proposals for papers, symposium presentations and poster presentations are invited on any topic of interest to the amateur satellite community. AMSAT requests a tentative title no later than August 1. Final copy must be submitted by September 15 for inclusion in the printed proceedings. Abstracts and papers should be sent to Dan Schultz, N8FGV. The 2015 AMSAT Space Symposium and Annual Meeting will be held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in downtown Dayton. -- Thanks to AMSAT News Service

International DX Association Encourages Humanitarian Dimension to DXpeditions: The International DX Association (INDEXA) has announced that it intends to make additional funding available to DXpedition groups that carry out pre-approved plans to provide humanitarian aid and services that benefit the communities they visit. The incentive can be as much as an additional 15 percent to any financial support INDEXA offers the DXpedition. "INDEXA believes that many of the DXpeditions we support have a unique opportunity to perform humanitarian activities which will improve the lives of those indigenous people and communities they encounter on a DXpedition," INDEXA said in a June 29 news release. "Humanitarian activities come in a variety of forms including education, medical, and dental assistance, infrastructure improvements, and physical donations of goods and other services." INDEXA said there are many ways a DXpedition team or individual team members could "positively impact the lives of the people of the community or country the DXpedition team is visiting." -- Thanks to The Daily DX

The K7RA Solar Update

Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Solar activity perked up over the July 2-8 period, with average daily sunspot numbers increasing from 35.9 to 109.1, compared to the previous 7 days. Likewise, average daily solar flux increased from 100.7 to 123.2. Daily sunspot numbers were below 100 for June 16-July 3, bottoming out at 25 on June 27.

A moderate geomagnetic storm July 4-5 was caused by a solar wind stream. The mid-latitude A index from Fredericksburg, Virginia, for July 4-6 was 21, 16, and 9. The planetary A index, based on observations from a number of Northern Hemisphere magnetometers, was 19, 25, and 10 for the same days, and the college A index from Fairbanks, Alaska was 13, 31, and 18. The July 8 outlook predicted solar flux over the following 7 days at 121.1.

You can check how the daily 45-day forecast of solar flux has done historically. Click "Download this file."

The latest prediction has solar flux at 125 for July 9-11; 122 on July 12; 120 on July 13, 115 on July 14-15; 125 on July 16; 130 on July 17-18; then 125, 115, 110, and 105 for July 19-22, then 100 on July 23-26; 105, 110, and 112 for July 27-29; 115 for July 30-31; 120 on August 1, and 125 on August 2-4. Solar flux then peaks at 130 for August 10-14, then goes to 100 after August 18.

The planetary A index predictions are 5, 12, 25, and 20 for July 9-12; 8 on July 13-14; 5 on July 15-17; 8 on July 18-19; 5 for July 20-25; 8 on July 26, 5 for July 27-30; then 18, 25, and 12 for July 31-August 2; 5 for August 3-5; then 20 and 25 on August 6-7; 8 on August 8-9, and 5 for August 10-13.

For the near term, USAF and NOAA predict the geomagnetic field at quiet levels on July 9, quiet to active levels July 10, and unsettled to minor storm levels on day July 11.

In Friday's bulletin look for reports from readers, 6 meter updates, and updated forecasts. Send me your reports and observations.


Just Ahead in Radiosport
July 11 -- FISTS Summer Sprint

July 11-12 -- IARU HF World Championship (CW, SSB)

July 11-12 -- SKCC Weekend Sprintathon

July 12 -- CQC Great Colorado Gold Rush (CW)

July 15 -- RSGB 80 Meter Club Championship (SSB)

July 15-16 -- CWops Mini-CWT Test

July 16 -- NAQCC CW Sprint

July 17 -- NCCC RTTY Sprint

July 17 -- NCCC Sprint
See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information.


Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions and Events
July 10-11 -- Northern Florida Section Convention, Milton, Florida

July 13-16 -- Mobile Amateur Radio Awards Club Convention, The Villages, Florida

July 17-19 -- Montana State Convention, East Glacier, Montana

July 23-26 -- Central States VHF Society Conference, Westminster, Colorado

July 24-25 -- Oklahoma Section Convention, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

July 31-August 2 -- Rocky Mountain Division Convention, Bryce Canyon, Utah

August 1 -- Great Lakes Division Convention, Columbus, Ohio

August 7-8 -- South Texas Section Convention, Austin, Texas

August 7-9 -- New Mexico State Convention, Albuquerque, New Mexico

August 7-9 -- Pacific Northwest DX Convention, Everett, Washington

August 15-16 -- Alabama State Convention, Huntsville, Alabama

August 16 -- Kansas State Convention, Salina, Kansas

August 21-23 -- New England Division Convention, Boxborough, Massachusetts

August 22 -- West Virginia State Convention, Weston, West Virginia

August 30 -- Western Pennsylvania Section Convention, New Kensington, Pennsylvania

September 5-6 -- Roanoke Division Convention, Shelby, North Carolina

September 11-12 -- W9DXCC, Schaumburg, Illinois

September 11-13 -- Southwestern Division Convention, Torrance, California

September 12 -- Virginia Section Convention, Virginia Beach, Virginia

September 26 -- Washington State Convention, Spokane Valley, Washington
Find conventions and hamfests in your area.


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The ARRL Letter, July 9, 2015

Thu, 07/09/2015 - 14:35
The ARRL Letter
July 9, 2015
Rick Lindquist, WW1ME, Editor

[Note: Clicking on the story links below will take you to the news article as it appears in The ARRL Letter on the ARRL website.]




Amateur Radio Becomes Primary on 1900-2000 kHz on August 6

Amateur Radio will be upgraded from secondary to primary in the 1900-2000 kHz segment of 160 meters in the US on August 6. That's the effective date of the WRC-07 implementation Report and Order and WRC-12 Order portions of a lengthy FCC document released on April 27. Both appeared in the Federal Register on July 7; the Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) of the same proceeding was published in the Federal Register on July 2. The Radiolocation Service (RLS) has been primary in the band segment. The FCC also made a secondary allocation of 135.7-137.8 kHz to the Amateur Service, but this band will not be available until service rules have been adopted.

"The FCC action with respect to 1900-2000 kHz reduces the possibility that we might suffer in the future from new Radiolocation Service deployments," said ARRL CEO David Sumner, K1ZZ. "On the other hand, we will have to put up with radio buoys that have been operating illegally in the band but that now have been 'regularized' by the Commission."

The FCC said that while it had believed there was no non-Federal RLS use of the 1900-2000 kHz band, the record indicated there are maritime users, including the US "high seas" migratory species fishing fleets, making use of radio buoys in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans as well as within 200 nautical miles of the coast. It did not identify these users in the WRC-07 proceeding, however, "because they did not appear in its licensing database," it said.

"Apparently, fishing vessels have operated radio buoys in US waters under the belief that a ship station license issued under Part 80 of the Commission's rules permits operation of the buoys," the FCC Order continued. The FCC said a Part 80 license applies only to stations in the maritime services and does not authorize operation of radio stations requiring a Part 90 license, "such as the radio buoys at issue here."

The FCC said its action regarding 1900-2000 kHz supports increased use of 160 meters as reported by commenters in the proceeding and provides "spectrum support" for Amateur Radio emergency communication. The FCC said its action also offers the Amateur Service "the long-term security that primary status entails."

In removing the primary RLS allocation, the FCC added a new footnote to the US Table of Allocations that provides for radio buoy operations in the 1900-2000 kHz segment on a primary basis in Region 2 (the Americas) and on a secondary basis in Region 3, which limits operations to the open sea.

The FCC also concluded that it is in the public interest to establish a secondary Amateur Radio allocation at 135.7-137.8 kHz -- 2200 meters, although the new band is not yet authorized for amateur use. "In accordance with the WRC-07 Final Acts, the Commission also restricted use of this secondary Amateur Service allocation to amateur stations transmitting a maximum equivalent isotropically radiated power (EIRP) of 1 W." The Commission is inviting comments until August 31 on how it should structure operational rules for that allocation as well as for a proposed 472-479 kHz allocation, 630 meters. Read more.

ARRL Patrons Donate Warhol Print to League; Auction Proceeds Will Create Endowment

ARRL patron and well-known Hollywood producer Dave Bell, W6AQ, and his wife Sam, W6QLT (she's a quilter), have donated a signed Andy Warhol print to the ARRL. The artwork -- "Myths: Superman 1981" -- will be sold at auction and the proceeds used to create "The Dave Bell, W6AQ, Endowment Fund" to benefit the League. The print's value has been estimated to be in the vicinity of $150,000. Bell said he wanted to encourage other radio amateurs who might own valuable artworks to consider donating them to ARRL.

"I suspect that I'm not the only amateur art collector among the ham radio population," Bell told ARRL recently. "I'm not sure that it's ever occurred to any of these hams that one way to make a donation is to give a painting to the League."

Bell, a ham since 1951 and a past chairman of the ARRL Public Relations Committee, acquired the Superman print in the early 1990s, and it hung in his Hollywood office for years. "I was looking around for a Warhol, and a friend of mine was an art dealer, and he came across this 'Superman' print and he gave me a very good price on it, so I bought it," Bell said. He once owned another Warhol, which he gave to Hiram College, his alma mater.

Hollywood movie producer David Wolper sold the print to Bell, who said it had hung in Wolper's screening room for a decade or so. During his own working years, Bell was a television and movie producer. He started TV's "Unsolved Mysteries" and also produced some movies ("Nadia," "The Long Walk Home"). Amateur Radio was the focus of some of his productions, including "The World of Amateur Radio" and

"Amateur Radio Today." In 2003 the League presented Bell with its first Lifetime Achievement Award, for his work on films and videos about Amateur Radio. "I had an entertaining career," he punned. He was also the Dayton Hamvention® Amateur of the Year in 1984. His book World's Best Hobby, available from ARRL and elsewhere, details his professional and Amateur Radio lives.

One reason he purchased the Superman print in particular, he said, was that he could imagine an Amateur Radio handheld in the Man of Steel's outstretched hand. "He should be 'Superham,'" Bell quipped.

ARRL President Kay Craigie, N3KN, announced the donation in May at an ARRL donors' reception in conjunction with Dayton Hamvention®. "Dave and Sam have always supported ARRL most generously, and this latest gift to the Endowment Fund will ensure their support never stops," President Craigie told the gathering. "I would like to say 'thank you' for your thoughtful support. You are truly a 'Superman' to ARRL!" Read more.

Museum Donates Doug DeMaw, W1FB, Homebrew Equipment to ARRL

The Vintage Radio and Communications Museum of Connecticut (VRCMCT) has donated equipment designed by former ARRL staffer Doug Demaw, W1FB (SK), to ARRL Headquarters for exhibit. One of the most widely published technical writers in Amateur Radio, DeMaw -- who earlier held the call signs W1CER and W8HHS -- was on the HQ staff for 18 years, from 1965 to 1983, and he served as Senior Technical Editor and Technical Department Manager from 1970 to 1983. Beginning in 1970, he engineered a shift in emphasis toward solid-state design in QST and in The ARRL Handbook. After retiring in 1983, DeMaw founded Oak Hills Research, but he continued to write construction articles for QST as well as books, including W1FB's QRP Notebook and W1FB's Antenna Notebook.

"The ARRL has a significant collection of Amateur Radio-related historical documents and equipment," said ARRL Senior Test Engineer, Bob Allison, WB1GCM. "Besides the 'Evolution of Amateur Radio Equipment' exhibit at the Lab, we have a 'Made in the Lab' exhibit. Doug DeMaw and his Lab staff built equipment that many radio amateurs duplicated at home. They are an important part of the history of Amateur Radio and ARRL."

It's still unclear just how the museum ended up with its collection of DeMaw project prototypes. With the exception of his famous "Tuna Tin" QRP transmitter, which was detailed in the May 1976 issue of QST and also appeared on its cover, DeMaw retained his projects after the articles about them had been published, in line with the HQ custom of that era. When DeMaw died in 1997, though, the whereabouts of many of his construction projects was unknown. Recently, Allison spotted something that looked familiar in a box of parts at the VRCMCT. Allison, who is a museum board member and ARRL historical collection curator, instantly recognized a receiver that DeMaw had featured in a series of articles.

After some digging, more boxes containing other DeMaw construction projects were discovered. Apparently, an anonymous donor at some point had dropped off the items, some bearing Oak Hills Research stickers, at the museum. During an impromptu meeting conducted by Museum Director John Ellsworth, the museum board -- all ARRL members -- agreed that DeMaw's work belonged at ARRL Headquarters.

"We're in the preservation business too," said Ellsworth. "We're glad to make this donation to ARRL, which will preserve and display DeMaw's work." Read more.

Ham Radio Volunteers Support Oklahoma Freewheel Bicycle Ride

A small group of Amateur Radio operators and volunteers supported the Oklahoma Freewheel -- a cross-state bicycle tour -- June 7-13. Kenneth Baucum, KG5CBM, led the Amateur Radio contingent.

"This year, Freewheel started in Hollis, Oklahoma, and finished in Fort Smith, Arkansas," Baucum said. "Bicyclists completed a tour of about 500 miles in 7 days, completing an average of 65 miles each day." He said some of those in the ham radio contingent are also ARES volunteers.

Baucum said SAG support driver responsibilities included carrying water to replenish rest stops and rider water bottles on the route, as well as having spare tubes and tire pumps on hand to fix flat tires. "Cyclists would request support by flagging down a support vehicle, or calling the support number," he said. Baucum then would relay messages, as appropriate, to the driver nearest the incident.

"Common issues included flat tires, slipped chains, and shifters needing adjustment," Baucum said. "A few calls for medical support were handled by providing first aid, water, and shade or air conditioning for riders in distress."

Oklahoma Freewheel expressed its appreciation to the radio amateurs who volunteered and to for the support of local radio clubs and the use of their repeaters. Read more. -- Thanks to Kenneth Baucum, KG5CBM, and Lloyd Colston, KC5FM

Friedrichshafen HAM RADIO 2015 Hosts International Youth Gathering

The just-ended HAM RADIO 2015 in Friedrichshafen, Germany hosted an international gathering of Amateur Radio youth. HAM RADIO sponsors reported that more than 17,000 visitors attended the combined HAM RADIO and the Maker World 2015 events -- about the same as in 2014. HAM RADIO celebrated its 40th year this year and attracted visitors from around the world to the shores of Lake Constance.

"HAM RADIO 2015 went really well," said Steffen Schöppe, DL7ATE, chairman of the German Amateur Radio Club (DARC), which co-sponsored HAM RADIO and marked its 65th anniversary this year. "It met our expectations in every way. We are very pleased with the supporting program, such as teacher training, the Ham Rally, and the presentations."

On Saturday, June 27, German Youth Coordinator Annette Coenen, DL6SAK, and IARU Region 1 Youth Working Group Chair Lisa Leenders, PA2LS, jointly hosted the International Youth Meeting. IARU Region 1 sponsors a "Youngsters On The Air" (YOTA) program -- a 1-week summer youth exchange program involving 75 youthful radio amateurs and prospective hams from 22 countries -- held this year in Italy. Region 1 also sponsors a YOTA Month program each December.

One main discussion topic concerned the difficulty of obtaining an Amateur Radio license in some countries. Roadblocks cited included fees, minimum age, exam locations and levels, and availability of learning materials.

Presentations included the introduction of the new Youth Contest Program in IARU Region 1, and the youth contesting initiative at 9A1A and 9A1RBZ -- the "Amateur Radio in School" station of the Croatian DX Club. An Amateur Radio course has been integrated into the elective courses at the Technical School Rudera Boskovica in Croatia.

Each year there is a beginner's class, and students who pass can participate in 9A1RBZ activities. Since 2012, some 165 youngsters have completed the class. Aspiring young contesters are paired with experienced contesters at 9A1A. In 2014, nine youngsters joined the world-class 9A1A team for the CQ World Wide RTTY contest. By this year, 39 percent of the Croatian DX Club members were between the ages of 16 and 19.

"Youngsters are not interested only in mobile and Internet communications," the club concluded. "If you approach them in an appropriate way, they are recognizing Amateur Radio as a very interesting hobby." 9A1A will host an international youth contesting team twice a year starting in 2016.

The IARU R1 Youth Contest Program plans to pair teams of about six visiting young operators with about six home country operators at well-known contest stations throughout Europe. It will get under way this fall with a four-contest 2015-2016 schedule.

Several PowerPoint and synchronized-audio keynote lectures from HAM RADIO 2015 are available on the Documentary Archive website.

Pioneering Remote Multi-Multi K4VV Contesting Station Closes, But Project Continues

Due to health issues facing Jack Hammett, K4VV, the Virginia mountaintop station bearing his call sign that pioneered totally remote multioperator, multitransmitter (MM) contesting, has been shut down. The equipment is being dismantled and sold off. The K4VV remote multi-multi contest station project team won't be disbanding, however. Instead, it will transition from "Team K4VV" to "Team W0YR," operating from another Virginia station some 18 miles from the K4VV site, said Mike Lonneke, W0YR.

"This past winter's brutal conditions caused serious damage to antennas on three of the towers at the big K4VV contest station, sitting atop Virginia's Catoctin Ridge," Lonneke told ARRL. He said Hammett, a veteran contester, had built K4VV into a contest superstation, but more recent health problems had prevented him from being actively involved in the station's activities. The 20-member Team K4VV has been operating Hammett's station for the past 5 years at his invitation, and the contest enthusiasts turned K4VV into the first completely remote MM contesting superstation.

With no operators in the K4VV shack, Team K4VV finished 10th in the ARRL International DX SSB this past March, with a claimed score of 5.3 million points. At the end of March, the team managed an 11th place claimed finish in the CQ World Wide WPX SSB, operating as AC3U, racking up 14.3 million points.

"Then, things came apart," Lonneke said. "The drive mechanism on K4VV's Super Bertha failed, boom guys on the top four element 40 meter OWA Yagi worked loose and hung down, endangering other antennas, and several other serious problems came to light." He said Team K4VV members were ready to carry out the repairs, but when Lonneke approached Hammett to have the work done, he learned that, in view of Hammett's worsening health, his family had decided to close the station.

With its new name and renewed spirit, Team W0YR has begun planning to resume its totally remote MM contesting activities in earnest this September. W0YR recently took delivery of a new, additional tower. In June, Lonneke upgraded his station's vital Internet connection to equal the data throughput speeds that had been available at K4VV.

"The team is getting ready to work the IARU HF World Champsionship in order to 'wring out' any faults," Lonneke told ARRL this week. "Even though there is no MM category in the IARU, we will run MM and turn in a checklog." Read more. -- Thanks to Mike Lonneke, W0YR

UK Government Holds Up Export of Early Amateur Radio-Related TV Archive

Most encyclopedias say that the first transatlantic television transmissions took place via the Telstar I satellite in 1962, but TV images actually crossed the Atlantic in the late 1920s via an Amateur Radio transmitter, according to historical accounts. An archive of documents and other material related to that event from television pioneer John Logie Baird and his colleague Benjamin Clapp, [G]2KZ, is at risk of being exported, and the government doesn't want to see it leave Britain. Clapp's 2 kW transmitter was used to send the crude images to a receiving station near New York City, and the archive includes some of his Amateur Radio logbooks as well as a hand telegraph key. UK Culture Minister John Vaizey has declined to issue an export license in an effort to prevent the historic archive from leaving the UK.

According to a UK government statement, Baird -- a Scottish engineer -- and Clapp first transmitted the television images over telephone lines from Baird's laboratory in London to Clapp's house in Surrey. From there, Clapp's transmitter, identified by his Amateur Radio call sign, was used to send the images across the Atlantic, where Clapp was among those on hand in Hartsdale, New York, to receive them.

"Man's vision had spanned the ocean; transatlantic television was a demonstrated reality, and one more great dream of science was on the way to realization," said a February 9, 1928, account in The New York Times that cited an Associated Press reporter who witnessed the accomplishment. The Times article listed the operator of the "vision sound" receiving station as R.M. Hart, 2CVJ. The Times put Baird's feat on a par with Marconi's legendary transatlantic reception of the Morse code letter "s" many years earlier.

The archive, valued at more than $50,000, consists of Clapp's radio logbooks for the US receiving station as well as for his own [G]2KZ amateur station, plus "related paper ephemera," and a so-called "Phonovision" disc that contains an early video recording, made in the fall of 1927, depicting images of Baird's ventriloquist's dummy, "Stookie Bill." The Phonovision disc is believed to be the oldest surviving video recording. Baird had demonstrated his electro-mechanical television system to members of the Royal Institution a year earlier.

Vaizey based his decision to bar the possible export of the items on a recommendation by the Reviewing Committee on the Export of Works of Art and Objects of Cultural Interest (RCEWA), administered by Arts Council England. "The Columbia disc and the notes connected with this world first of a transantlantic video recording represents British ingenuity and invention at the highest level," said RCEWA Member Christopher Rowell. "The notes contain the first ever use of the acronym 'TV' for television. The excitement of the achievement rests in these objects, which we hope will remain in this country as a permanent testament to Logie Baird and his team. Their departure abroad would also be a serious loss to scholarship." Read more.

In Brief...

ARRL/TAPR Digital Communications Conference Seeks Papers: The 34th annual ARRL/TAPR Digital Communications Conference (DCC) invites technical papers for presentation at this year's conference. The 2015 DCC will take place October 9-11 in Chicago. Technical papers are solicited for presentation at DCC and publication in the Conference Proceedings, published by ARRL. Presentation at the conference is not required for publication. Submit papers by August 17 to Maty Weinberg, KB1EIB, at ARRL (or mail to Maty Weinberg, ARRL, 225 Main St, Newington, CT 06111). Papers will be published exactly as submitted, and authors will retain all rights. Early conference registration closes on September 19.

Get Ready for the Golden Packet Event! APRS Developer Bob Bruninga, WB4APR, has invited radio amateurs to take part in the annual Golden Packet Event on Saturday, July 18. Begun in 2009, the event is a demonstration of the ability to relay text messages via the Automatic Packet Reporting System (APRS®) along the length of the Appalachian Trail -- all without the use of the Internet. All participants need is an APRS digipeating transceiver and an APRS handheld transceiver for backup messaging.

CAMSAT Renames, Postpones Six-Satellite Launch: CAMSAT has announced new nomenclature for the six satellites that it planned to launch this summer. CAS-3A through F have been re-designated as the XW-2 (Hope-2) amateur satellite system -- XW-2A through F. CAMSAT said this week that all six satellites have completed environmental testing and are currently undergoing burn-in testing. The satellites will be moved to the launch site in mid-August, but the launch has been postponed from mid-July until early September. The six satellites are equipped with substantially identical Amateur Radio payloads -- a U/V mode linear transponder, a CW telemetry beacon and an AX.25 19.2k/9.6k baud GMSK telemetry downlink, a CAMSAT announcement said in May. CAMSAT said that each Amateur Radio complement has the same technical characteristics, but will operate on different 70 centimeter uplink and 2 meter downlink frequencies.

MRHS "Night of Nights 2015" Set for July 12: The Marine Radio Historical Society (MRHS) will hold its annual "Night of Nights" event, in which historic maritime CW stations such as KPH and WLO return to the air for a few hours on July 13 UTC (July 12 in US time zones) along with some US Coast Guard stations. The event commemorates the days when coast station and shipboard radio operators transmitted their message traffic via Morse code. A pair of Amateur Radio stations -- K6KPH and W4WLO -- will be active on CW as well, and QSL cards will be sent to those who copy the text of the maritime stations' CW signals or work the ham stations. The coast stations shut down in the late 1990s, but the MRHS has resurrected KPH and attempts to preserve the history of the era.

AMSAT 2015 Symposium Invites Papers: AMSAT has issued the first call for papers for its Annual Meeting and Space Symposium, set for October 16-18 in Dayton, Ohio. Proposals for papers, symposium presentations and poster presentations are invited on any topic of interest to the amateur satellite community. AMSAT requests a tentative title no later than August 1. Final copy must be submitted by September 15 for inclusion in the printed proceedings. Abstracts and papers should be sent to Dan Schultz, N8FGV. The 2015 AMSAT Space Symposium and Annual Meeting will be held at the Crowne Plaza Hotel in downtown Dayton. -- Thanks to AMSAT News Service

International DX Association Encourages Humanitarian Dimension to DXpeditions: The International DX Association (INDEXA) has announced that it intends to make additional funding available to DXpedition groups that carry out pre-approved plans to provide humanitarian aid and services that benefit the communities they visit. The incentive can be as much as an additional 15 percent to any financial support INDEXA offers the DXpedition. "INDEXA believes that many of the DXpeditions we support have a unique opportunity to perform humanitarian activities which will improve the lives of those indigenous people and communities they encounter on a DXpedition," INDEXA said in a June 29 news release. "Humanitarian activities come in a variety of forms including education, medical, and dental assistance, infrastructure improvements, and physical donations of goods and other services." INDEXA said there are many ways a DXpedition team or individual team members could "positively impact the lives of the people of the community or country the DXpedition team is visiting." -- Thanks to The Daily DX

The K7RA Solar Update

Tad Cook, K7RA, Seattle, reports: Solar activity perked up over the July 2-8 period, with average daily sunspot numbers increasing from 35.9 to 109.1, compared to the previous 7 days. Likewise, average daily solar flux increased from 100.7 to 123.2. Daily sunspot numbers were below 100 for June 16-July 3, bottoming out at 25 on June 27.

A moderate geomagnetic storm July 4-5 was caused by a solar wind stream. The mid-latitude A index from Fredericksburg, Virginia, for July 4-6 was 21, 16, and 9. The planetary A index, based on observations from a number of Northern Hemisphere magnetometers, was 19, 25, and 10 for the same days, and the college A index from Fairbanks, Alaska was 13, 31, and 18. The July 8 outlook predicted solar flux over the following 7 days at 121.1.

You can check how the daily 45-day forecast of solar flux has done historically. Click "Download this file."

The latest prediction has solar flux at 125 for July 9-11; 122 on July 12; 120 on July 13, 115 on July 14-15; 125 on July 16; 130 on July 17-18; then 125, 115, 110, and 105 for July 19-22, then 100 on July 23-26; 105, 110, and 112 for July 27-29; 115 for July 30-31; 120 on August 1, and 125 on August 2-4. Solar flux then peaks at 130 for August 10-14, then goes to 100 after August 18.

The planetary A index predictions are 5, 12, 25, and 20 for July 9-12; 8 on July 13-14; 5 on July 15-17; 8 on July 18-19; 5 for July 20-25; 8 on July 26, 5 for July 27-30; then 18, 25, and 12 for July 31-August 2; 5 for August 3-5; then 20 and 25 on August 6-7; 8 on August 8-9, and 5 for August 10-13.

For the near term, USAF and NOAA predict the geomagnetic field at quiet levels on July 9, quiet to active levels July 10, and unsettled to minor storm levels on day July 11.

In Friday's bulletin look for reports from readers, 6 meter updates, and updated forecasts. Send me your reports and observations.


Just Ahead in Radiosport
July 11 -- FISTS Summer Sprint

July 11-12 -- IARU HF World Championship (CW, SSB)

July 11-12 -- SKCC Weekend Sprintathon

July 12 -- CQC Great Colorado Gold Rush (CW)

July 15 -- RSGB 80 Meter Club Championship (SSB)

July 15-16 -- CWops Mini-CWT Test

July 16 -- NAQCC CW Sprint

July 17 -- NCCC RTTY Sprint

July 17 -- NCCC Sprint
See the ARRL Contest Calendar for more information.


Upcoming ARRL Section, State, and Division Conventions and Events
July 10-11 -- Northern Florida Section Convention, Milton, Florida

July 13-16 -- Mobile Amateur Radio Awards Club Convention, The Villages, Florida

July 17-19 -- Montana State Convention, East Glacier, Montana

July 23-26 -- Central States VHF Society Conference, Westminster, Colorado

July 24-25 -- Oklahoma Section Convention, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

July 31-August 2 -- Rocky Mountain Division Convention, Bryce Canyon, Utah

August 1 -- Great Lakes Division Convention, Columbus, Ohio

August 7-8 -- South Texas Section Convention, Austin, Texas

August 7-9 -- New Mexico State Convention, Albuquerque, New Mexico

August 7-9 -- Pacific Northwest DX Convention, Everett, Washington

August 15-16 -- Alabama State Convention, Huntsville, Alabama

August 16 -- Kansas State Convention, Salina, Kansas

August 21-23 -- New England Division Convention, Boxborough, Massachusetts

August 22 -- West Virginia State Convention, Weston, West Virginia

August 30 -- Western Pennsylvania Section Convention, New Kensington, Pennsylvania

September 5-6 -- Roanoke Division Convention, Shelby, North Carolina

September 11-12 -- W9DXCC, Schaumburg, Illinois

September 11-13 -- Southwestern Division Convention, Torrance, California

September 12 -- Virginia Section Convention, Virginia Beach, Virginia

September 26 -- Washington State Convention, Spokane Valley, Washington
Find conventions and hamfests in your area.


The ARRL Letter appreciates the support of these advertisers:

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ARRL members can opt to receive The ARRL Letter (with color images!) directly via e-mail. If you are not an ARRL member, consider joining now to receive this and other benefits, including the monthly ARRL journal, QST (and the QST online digital edition). The ARRL — the national association of Amateur Radio is the only organization representing Amateur Radio in the US. As an ARRL member you support the ranks of thousands of other ham radio enthusiasts shaping the Amateur Radio Service today. If you consider yourself an active ham, you need ARRL now. Membership costs as little as $39 a year. ARRL members have access to the ARRL Archive and Periodical Search, the Product Review Archive, E-Mail Forwarding, a voice in the affairs of ARRL and ham radio through locally appointed volunteers and much more! Become part of the future of ham radio. Join the ARRL today!

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CQmaps Azimuthal Map for Green Heron Engineering GH Everyware

Tue, 07/07/2015 - 16:29
Green Heron Engineering and CQmaps - Professional Maps for Amateur Radio have partnered to provide a personalized Azimuthal Projection (Great Circle) map for your Green Heron Everywhere (GH Everyware) rotor control software.


The GH Everyware Azimuthal Projection map will provide your rotor control software with the personalized touch and expert functionality you have come to expect from Green Heron Engineering and CQmaps.

Your map will consist of the full Great Circle view of the Earth as projected from your QTH. Most DX Entities and Countries are listed by prefix within the map. CQ Zones along with the CQmaps thematic color grouping are also presented. With the GH Everywhere rotor control, you will simply find your DX area of interest and point the beam heading!

The GH Everyware Azimuthal Projection Map also contains your Maidenhead Grid Square along with your Latitude & Longitude and time zone. Your Name and Call Sign round out the personalized touch.

Your map will be based on a 1080 x 1080 Portable Network Graphics (.png) that will be scalable to the size of your monitor. You will have the ability to shift the size of the map within GH Everyware Rotor Display Configuration menu. The map will not skew or become warped while resizing.

The GH Everyware Azimuthal Projection Map .png file will be emailed to you typically within 24 hours (Monday - Friday) to the email address provided in the billing address.


GreenHeron06122015.png

Screen Shot
Attached Images

CQmaps Azimuthal Map for Green Heron Engineering GH Everyware

Tue, 07/07/2015 - 16:29
Green Heron Engineering and CQmaps - Professional Maps for Amateur Radio have partnered to provide a personalized Azimuthal Projection (Great Circle) map for your Green Heron Everywhere (GH Everyware) rotor control software.


The GH Everyware Azimuthal Projection map will provide your rotor control software with the personalized touch and expert functionality you have come to expect from Green Heron Engineering and CQmaps.

Your map will consist of the full Great Circle view of the Earth as projected from your QTH. Most DX Entities and Countries are listed by prefix within the map. CQ Zones along with the CQmaps thematic color grouping are also presented. With the GH Everywhere rotor control, you will simply find your DX area of interest and point the beam heading!

The GH Everyware Azimuthal Projection Map also contains your Maidenhead Grid Square along with your Latitude & Longitude and time zone. Your Name and Call Sign round out the personalized touch.

Your map will be based on a 1080 x 1080 Portable Network Graphics (.png) that will be scalable to the size of your monitor. You will have the ability to shift the size of the map within GH Everyware Rotor Display Configuration menu. The map will not skew or become warped while resizing.

The GH Everyware Azimuthal Projection Map .png file will be emailed to you typically within 24 hours (Monday - Friday) to the email address provided in the billing address.


GreenHeron06122015.png

Screen Shot
Attached Images

Episode 3: 100 Watts and a Wire with Christian Cudnik, KØSTH​

Mon, 07/06/2015 - 17:48
On this episode, we recap the 13 Colonies Special Event. Tim Duffy, K3LR visits with Christian, and a spontaneous on air group assembles on 40M. You won't believe who shows up!

http://100wattsandawire.com/100-watt...kes-to-the-air


Fans of 'Ham Nation' may recognize Christian, KØSTH from his work as the host of the "New Ham" segment.

'100 Watts and a Wire' is a program celebrating amateur radio through the eyes of a 'new' ham.

The show will feature topical conversation and interviews, news and an entertaining look at the adventures of a ham trying to figure it all out. We'll explore the interesting layers of this diverse hobby and service.

'100 Watts and a Wire' is perfect for those who are new to ham radio, their Elmer’s, the seasoned radio operator and the technically curious crowd.

You don't have to spend a fortune to get on the air and have fun!

Join Emmy winner Christian Cudnik, KØSTH and Katie Allen, WY7YL for an inside a look at the world of amateur radio.

Episode 3: 100 Watts and a Wire with Christian Cudnik, KØSTH​

Mon, 07/06/2015 - 17:48
On this episode, we recap the 13 Colonies Special Event. Tim Duffy, K3LR visits with Christian, and a spontaneous on air group assembles on 40M. You won't believe who shows up!

http://100wattsandawire.com/100-watt...kes-to-the-air


Fans of 'Ham Nation' may recognize Christian, KØSTH from his work as the host of the "New Ham" segment.

'100 Watts and a Wire' is a program celebrating amateur radio through the eyes of a 'new' ham.

The show will feature topical conversation and interviews, news and an entertaining look at the adventures of a ham trying to figure it all out. We'll explore the interesting layers of this diverse hobby and service.

'100 Watts and a Wire' is perfect for those who are new to ham radio, their Elmer’s, the seasoned radio operator and the technically curious crowd.

You don't have to spend a fortune to get on the air and have fun!

Join Emmy winner Christian Cudnik, KØSTH and Katie Allen, WY7YL for an inside a look at the world of amateur radio.

Solar storms hit Earth, experts concerned

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 15:39
In recent weeks, immense solar storms have affected the planet Earth. Some of them pushed the Aurora Borealis south, thereby lighting up North American skies. The Space Weather Prediction Center of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration attributed the event to a CME or coronal mass ejection that sent massive waves of solar atmospheric materials toward the Earth.
"This event is expected to be weaker than the severe geomagnetic storm from earlier in the week," said a representative of the SWPC in an interview with CBS. The representative was referring to the third solar storm that hit the Earth from June 27 to 28.




The SWPC released an assessment last June 28 after the storm hit the planet. "A CME associated with the R2 (Moderate) Radio Blackout on 25 June glanced past the Earth early on 27 June, but did not cause geomagnetic storms as forecasters had predicted. The sunspot region that produced the event, NOAA AR 12371, is beginning to transit the west limb and forecasters are expecting low solar activity for the upcoming week," the assessment on the SWPC website said.

Earlier last June, two coronal mass ejections hit the Earth and caused the massive Aurora Borealis anomaly. The first took place last June 20 and the second, last June 22. Sightings of the Northern lights came in from Minnesota, South Dakota, West Virginia, Virginia, Wyoming and New Hampshire.
In a 2012 interview with Big Think, Michio Kaku, theoretical physicist best known for his involvement in the String Theory, explained how CMEs happen and how solar storms could gravely affect an electronic civilization, such as the one we have today. He said: "In 1859, at the famous Carrington event, some place fires got started because telegraph wires were overloaded."
"Society as we know it would be thrown back perhaps 100 years into the past," Kaku concluded after hypothesizing that if the same Carrington event happened today, satellites, power stations and all electronic devices would be wiped out.
Every 11 years, the North and South poles of the Sun flip and release a burst of energy called a sunspot cycle. Kaku likened the sunspot cycles to rifles which eject huge bursts of energy in the Earth's direction. Oftentimes, the Earth dodges these burst, but as the Carrington event suggests, the planet can suffer a direct hit.

ICQPodcast interviews Graham Somerville BHI Noise Cancelling Products

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 11:13
Martin Butler (M1MRB / W9ICQ) of the ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast interviews Graham Somerville of BHI Noise Cancelling Products at the Ham Radio Friedrichshafen Show.




You can download the free ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast Audio Show at http://icqpodcast.com/download-the-show/


Latest Amateur / Ham Radio News - http://icqpodcast.com/news/


ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast - http://www.icqpodcast.com

ICQPodcast interviews Graham Somerville BHI Noise Cancelling Products

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 11:13
Martin Butler (M1MRB / W9ICQ) of the ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast interviews Graham Somerville of BHI Noise Cancelling Products at the Ham Radio Friedrichshafen Show.




You can download the free ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast Audio Show at http://icqpodcast.com/download-the-show/


Latest Amateur / Ham Radio News - http://icqpodcast.com/news/


ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast - http://www.icqpodcast.com

ICQPodcast interviews Paul Bigwood (G3WYW) Yaesu

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 11:10
Martin Butler (M1MRB / W9ICQ) of the ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast interviews Paul Bigwood (G3WYW) from Yaesu at the Ham Radio Friedrichshafen Show.



You can download the free ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast Audio Show at http://icqpodcast.com/download-the-show/

Latest Amateur / Ham Radio News - http://icqpodcast.com/news/

ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast - http://www.icqpodcast.com

ICQPodcast interviews Paul Bigwood (G3WYW) Yaesu

Sat, 07/04/2015 - 11:10
Martin Butler (M1MRB / W9ICQ) of the ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast interviews Paul Bigwood (G3WYW) from Yaesu at the Ham Radio Friedrichshafen Show.



You can download the free ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast Audio Show at http://icqpodcast.com/download-the-show/

Latest Amateur / Ham Radio News - http://icqpodcast.com/news/

ICQ Amateur / Ham Radio Podcast - http://www.icqpodcast.com